More people have mentioned it and I think it should be part of every Rust tutorial to encourage people to just clone() whenever they get in a jam and get their stuff done: “keep calm, clone and move on”. I think that one thing will make it possible to onboard any team onto Rust quickly and get them shipping.

Performance will still be better than in most other languages and you can optimize this stuff out after you’ve got things to work.

https://blog.sdf.com/p/fast-development-in-rust-part-one

The Netherlands is facing similar problems where depressed salaries, lack of housing and rampant overt racism are making it difficult to attract digital talent from all over the world.

You know, countries could have promoted STEM education as a pursuit decades ago but given the state of things, nothing is getting done in technology without people from outside of Europe. Let’s see whether we make the smart choice this time round, or whether we’ll see countries ‘cutting their nose to spite their face’ as the saying goes.

https://www.golem.de/news/tech-standort-ostdeutschland-als-waere-das-image-nicht-schon-schlecht-genug-2403-182921.html

Amos’s style of software engineering historiography accompanied with snide commentary on the state of the art is both educational and entertaining. The weird factoids about Github Actions are the main act here but don’t miss out on the introduction on software delivery or the lead out on capitalism.

(Also I’m in the credits on this one!)

The news that an OSINT researcher spent 30 minutes to find a fugitive that the German police couldn’t find in the past 30 years says a lot about how government works here.

Most likely the police would say that they couldn’t use any modern tools or data sources here because of Datenschutz (data protection) reasons. Datenschutz is 1. a great excuse for people who don’t want to do their jobs and 2. a way to protect every kind of crook and criminal.

Take Germany for instance — when Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer was defense minister, she tried to reform the Bundeswehr Procurement Office with little success. Currently, over 11,000 employees work for the agency — an enormous increase since the Cold War, when considerably more material was being procured by considerably fewer employees. In 2010, the procurement office was already heavily criticized for its inefficiency and large size, with its 8,500 employees — and the situation still seems dire.

That is a wild number of people who are not getting anything done and who then become a pension burden on the public budget.

https://www.politico.eu/article/european-armament-commissioner-defense-war-security/

Even as the world has caught up with him, Finkelstein remains most comfortable on the margins — ideologically aligned with a left that won’t always have him, platformed by a right that won’t always listen, and insulting them both.

Yet Finkelstein is ambivalent about being pressed back into the cause and sympathetic to younger generations’ relative lack of interest in “old fogies.” “I recognize,” he said, “that it is your moment, it’s not my moment.”

A pretty fair profile of a man who’s a polarizing character.

https://www.thedriftmag.com/normcore/